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Key Species Exmoor | Wildwatch 2014 | Duddings News

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Five key species to look out for on Exmoor in 2014

As a National Park, Exmoor is alive with wildlife and as with any large and mostly uninhabited area, nobody’s quite certain exactly what animals or how many animals are living on the moor.
Which is why Exmoor Wildwatch 2014 has been launched to try and produce the most complete picture yet of how inhabited the wilds of Exmoor really are.
So with many people set to visit our Minehead holiday cottages this year we thought we’d take a look at the list of animals to look out for and put together a mini-guide for our guests.
Any who do spot some of these animals can contact the National Park authority on 01598 752509 or visit the
Wildwatch website.
So without any further ado, here are five key animal species to look out for on Exmoor this year:



The Cuckoo

The cuckoo is one of Britain’s most distinctive birds but is only spotted during the summer, since it winters in Africa.
The innocent looking cuckoo is actually a parasite and lays its eggs in the nest of other birds, leaving them to be incubated by unsuspecting birds of different species.

European Cuckoo | Exmoor National Park | Duddings Holiday Cottages




The Kingfisher

There are around 90 different species of kingfisher and all have large heads, long, sharp, pointed bills, short legs, and stubby tails.
The variety found on Exmoor has bright  feathers and eats fish, which it catches by swooping down from a perch into rivers
.

Kingfisher | Exmoor National Park | Duddings Holiday Cottages



The Brown Hare

Hares are larger than most species of rabbit, have longer ears and hind legs and breed on the ground rather than in a burrow.
Exmoor brown hares are generally nocturnal and shy, making them hard to spot, Apart, that is, from in spring when they can be seen in broad daylight chasing one another around fields and meadows. During the spring frenzy, they can even be seen boxing, hence the term "mad March hares".


Brown Hare | Exmoor National Park | Duddings Holiday Cottages




The Adder

Britain’s only native wild snake spends its summers basking in sunshine on Exmoor, meaning it’s best sighted on warm days.
Adder’s aren’t generally dangerous and will only bite humans or dogs if they’re alarmed or disturbed. While bites can be very painful, they’re very rarely fatal.


Adder | Exmoor National Park | Duddings Holiday Cottages



The Common Lizard

Usually less than five inches long, the Common lizard is the most northerly dwelling off all reptiles.
Because of the colder conditions in Northern Europe it usually gives birth to live young rather than lay eggs.


Common Lizard | Exmoor National Park | Duddings Holiday Cottages
 
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